Autism Awareness Month Selections

A 2007 Centers for Disease Control report found that 1 in 150 children in America today have an autism spectrum disorder. The Autism Society of America estimates that 1.5 million Americans and their families are now affected. As such, more and more books on the subject are being written each day. Here are a few standouts from our shelves:


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Not Even Wrong: Adventures In Autism by Paul Collins, 2004

Author Paul Collins’ son, Morgan, was diagnosed with autism at the age of two. In Not Even Wrong, Collins intersperses a historical look at autism with his family’s personal experience. An informative and engaging read that serves as a good introduction to the subject. Check catalog for availability


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Born On A Blue Day: Inside The Extraordinary Mind Of An Autistic Savant by Daniel Tammet, 2007

Author Tammet has savant-like powers on the order of Rain Man. Especially when it comes to his to aptitude for memorizing numbers and language. He sets a record by remembering and reciting the mathematical constant Pi to 22514 places. He later learns Icelandic (considered by many to be one of the world's most difficult languages) in one week. At the same time he often struggles with what for most of us are considered simple social interactions. In this memoir, Tammet shares the workings of his mind and details his path to a successful self-sufficient life. Check catalog for availability


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Look Me In The Eye: My Life With Asperger’s by John Elder Robison, 2007

John Elder Robinson was rather recently diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, a high-functioning form of autism. It helped him put his life in perspective and spurred by his brother and acclaimed author, Augusten Burroughs, to write this book. With an innate facility for mechanical and electrical design, Robinson worked as a special effects guru for the rock group KISS, a toy designer for Milton Bradley and now owns and operates a repair shop for high-end automobiles. But along the way he struggled through an odd upbringing and living with an undiagnosed disease. Check catalog for availability


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The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time by Mark Haddon, 2003

A comical and touching fictional account of a 15-year-old autistic named Christopher John Francis Boone and his attempt to solve a crime. One of those books that you’ll want to read in a single sitting – especially as Christopher ventures out into the city alone (aside from his pet rat that is) and suspense builds along the way. Author Haddon takes from his past experience working with autistic youth and creates a likeable and memorable character in Christopher. Check catalog for availability


- Submitted by Tom @ MPL Central

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This page contains a single entry by published on April 15, 2008 8:12 PM.

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