Devil Dogs: Fighting Marines of World War I by George B. Clark

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On February 12th, 1918, Army General John J. "Black Jack" Pershing is quoted as saying "Why the hell can't the Army do it if the Marines can. They are the same kind of men; why can't they be like Marines."
Author George B. Clark attempts to answer the question raised by "Black Jack" Pershing and goes on to describe, in a well researched and engaging style, how the U.S. Marines made a name for themselves on the Western Front of WWI .
Clark argues that due to terrible upper echelon leadership on the Army's part, Marine units were often stranded on perimeters or left in "no-mans-land" outside of protective artillery range. This battlefield isolation lead to individual Marine units acting on their own with little or no coordination with the high command. The fierceness of the Marines small unit attacks lead the Germans at Belleau Wood to refer to the attacking Marines as "Teufel Hunden" or as translated "Hounds from Hell." The term "Devil Dogs" has been used to describe the Marine Corps since.
This fact filled but fun book describes the Corps role through all their battles during World War I and describes how tactics developed during that war shaped the way the Marine Corps still trains and operates today.
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Submitted by Dan@Central


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This page contains a single entry by Dan K. published on January 25, 2011 2:53 PM.

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