Volumes on Vegetables

Are your vegetables are coming in faster than you can eat them? Now is the time to try new recipes for all the fruit and vegetables you are harvesting. If you don't have an urban garden, then get thee to a Farmer's Market. Milwaukee Public Library has a huge selection of cookbooks to provide you with an abundance of ideas to encourage you and expand your repertoire of recipes. If you want to preserve all that freshness, we have some new books that will help, too.

Here are a few:

artofveggiescover.jpgThe Art of Cooking with Vegetables by Alain Passard. Chef and restaurant owner of L'Arpège in Paris presents recipes that are introduced to entice. These will leave you eager to try combinations that are something a bit different but with easily accessible vegetables. Imagine a "summer mosaic of green vegetables" or "a harlequin's garden of vegetables dressed with stuffed dates". Oh Yum! Wine pairings are provided, too.

freshgreencover.jpgThe Fresh and Green Table by Susie Middleton. The author's hope is that you incorporate more vegetables into your meals. You won't miss the meat with these recipes. Don't "Summer-on- a-Pizza" (right now) and "A-Walk-In-the-Woods Pizza" (in fall) sound divine? Very detailed instructions on everything from main dish salads, one dish dinners, eggs and veggies, gratins, gallettes, tarts and veggie pasta sauces should give you perfect-every-time results.

gardengrillcover.jpgThe Gardener and the Grill by Karen Adler and Judith Fertig. Hop on! The garden-to-grill movement is moving fast. Known as the Barbecue Queens, the authors believe grilling gives more flavor and they share recipes for grilling vegetables, breads, greens, and fruit, Vibrant recipes for dressings, marinades and rubs chock full of herbs and spices are unique and designed to enhance the flavors of meats and vegetables alike. Your whole foods have never tasted so good.

herbivoracicover.jpgHerbivoracious by Michael Natkin. By the author of the blog of the same name, come sophisticated vegetarian recipes. Non-vegetarians will find an abundant variety here, too. Cheddar-battered onion rings, anyone?

rawsomelycover.jpgRawsomely Vegan by Mike Snyder. You'll find 300 nutritious, scrumptious, fantabulous recipes to satiate your hunger. Legumes, seeds and nuts are given ample explanations while fourteen chapters cover everything you can imagine: dips, drinks, desserts, salad, soup, smoothies, salads, sauces, spreads, sides, sandwiches and s'more.

zuppecover.jpgZuppe by Mona Talbott. Soup gems from the kitchen of The American Academy in Rome are arranged by season. Peas, peppers, potatoes, zucchini, tomatoes all find a home among these soups. The summer chapter includes three soups that can be served at room temperature and three that should be served cold. Spring's "Minestra Verdissima" (so fun to say that out loud) uses eight vegetables from your garden or market.

For more selections please use or click on these subject headings in our catalog: Cooking (Vegetables), Canning and Preserving, or Cooking Natural Foods. To accompany to all those vegetables you may want to check out all of our great barbecue books, too.

Rebecca D @ Central


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This page contains a single entry by Tim published on September 7, 2012 8:30 AM.

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