Results tagged “Language of Conservation”

The Prose and Poetry of Place: August Derleth and Aldo Leopold
Saturday, April 9th from 2-3 p.m.
Central Library Krug Rare Books Room
814 W. Wisconsin Ave., 2nd Floor

Leopold.jpgAldo Leopold, father of the land ethic and the ecological movement, wrote in a lyrical prose style of his appreciation for the natural environment.

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August Derleth, prolific Wisconsin author, captured a lifetime of intimacy with the Wisconsin landscape in his nature poetry and essays. Both found their home in Sauk County, Wisconsin. Join us for a program exploring the writings of these two renowned Wisconsin authors.

This program will be presented by James P. Roberts, poet and Past President of the August Derleth Society and Professor Stanley A. Temple, Senior Fellow and Science Advisor at the Aldo Leopold Foundation.

The Poetry and Prose of Place is a Language of Conservation Program. The Language of Conservation is an initiative of Poets House in partnership with the Milwaukee County Zoo and Milwaukee Public Library, made possible by a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Photo of Aldo Leopold curtesy of USFS. August Derleth photo from the Historic Portrait Collection / Milwaukee Public Library.


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Aldo Leopold Book Discussion at Central Library

Join us at the Central Library Krug Rare Books Room for a book discussion on Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac.This collection of essays has informed and changed the environmental movement and stimulated a widespread interest in ecology as a science. Join us for a discussion of Leopold's work as well as our environment in general. A responsible relationship between people and the land they inhabit becomes more important everyday. What ideas do you have to inspire change?

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Tuesday, April 5th from 6-7 p.m.
Central Library Krug Rare Books Room
814 W. Wisconsin Ave.

This event is a Language of Conservation Program. The Language of Conservation is an initiative of Poets House in partnership with the Milwaukee County Zoo and Milwaukee Public Library, made possible by a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.


Photo curtesy of the Aldo Leopold Foundation




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Poems that Turn with the Seasons

Join MPL on Saturday, November 6th from 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. in Central Library's Centennial Hall for our latest poetry program, Poems that Turn with the Seasons.

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From haiku to ode, great poetry has always connected us with earth's cycles. This program will help you rediscover how poetry attunes us to the motions of our moving and vulnerable planet. Poet Annie Finch shares some of her favorite seasonal poems, along with tips for using poetic rhythm to align yourself with the changing year.

Annie Finch is author of the poetry collections Among the Goddesses, Calendars, The Encyclopedia of Scotland, and Eve, reissued in Carnegie Mellon's Classic Contemporaries Poetry Series. Her other works include libretti; music, theater, and art collaborations; translation; and several anthologies and books on poetry. Winner of a Black Earth fellowship and the Robert Fitzgerald Award, she is Director of the Stonecoast MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Southern Maine.

This is a Language of Conservation program. The Language of Conservation is an initiative of Poets House in partnership with the Milwaukee County Zoo and Milwaukee Public Library, made possible by a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.


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Earth Poets & Musicians @ MPL

Celebrate the Autumn Equinox with poetry and song!

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(In the photo from left: Harvey Taylor, Louisa Loveridge Gallas, Jahmes Tony Finlayson, Suzanne Rosenblatt, Jeff Poniewaz and Holly Haebig)

On Thursday, September 23rd at 7:00 p.m. in the Loos Room of Central Library's Centennial Hall, Earth Poets and Musicians will deliver an eco-empowering performance. Since 1988 the Earth Poets have been performing together in praise and defense of the natural world. With the addition in the past decade of two singer-musicians, they have added music and song to their celebration of our planet.

This event is free and open to the public. It is part of the Language of Conservation program series. The Language of Conservation is an initiative of Poets House in partnership with the Milwaukee County Zoo and Milwaukee Public Library, made possible by a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.


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Lions and tigers and poems! Oh, my!

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Photo by Mark Hines

After a lifetime of trips to the Milwaukee County Zoo (first at Washington Park and now on Blue Mound Road), I doubted anything could ever refresh the experience for me. The onslaught of careening double-wide strollers, the 'signature fragrance' of the Small Mammals Building, overhearing parents trying to explain just what those two monkeys are doing, the possibility of a guano shower in the Aviary, the relentless white noise of a thousand excited children...ah, memories.

So it was a revelation to visit the Zoo with a friend to check out the poetry installed throughout the grounds by The Language of Conservation program funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Milwaukee County Zoo and the Milwaukee Public Library with help from Poets House. With map and list of poem titles in hand, we embarked on a quest to seek out and savor selections from a menagerie of poets. There are poems etched on exhibit glass, hanging in trees, carved into stone or wood, on curving metal scrolls, or lettered on mobiles and banners. Like trying to spot a well camouflaged animal, the poetry will suddenly reveal itself to the attentive hunter. Standing silently amid the swirling throng and having a poem perfectly connect to creature or place is a revelation.

Alison Apotheker's "Why I Said Jellyfish", Michael Glaser's "The Presence of Trees" and Jorge Luis Borges' "The Other Tiger" were three favorites. To read the timeless words of May Swenson's Motherhood, then watch the baby orangutan Mahal cuddled in his adoptive mother's lap is delightful, even for someone as cynical as I. I know we missed finding some of the poems during our three hour visit, so we will definitely be planning another trip soon - by then I hope someone develops a GPS (Global Poetry Sensor)!

Submitted by Christine @ MPL Central


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