October 2012 Archives

Credit-cards.jpgAre you curious about how your credit history affects your purchasing power? Come find out this Saturday, November 3rd, at the Atkinson Library. Lynette Jarreau from BMO Harris Bank will present Your Credit, Your Home, & Your Future. She will answer questions on how your credit report affects you and your ability to purchase a home. This program is free and no registration is required.

Location: Atkinson Library
Date: Saturday, November 3rd, 2012
Time: 3 P.M. to 4 P.M.


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Meet Author Sherman Alexie!

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Meet Sherman Alexie author of Blasphemy: New and Collected Stories on Tuesday, November 13th! Sherman Alexie's stature as a writer of stories, poetry, and novels has soared over the course of his twenty-two-book, twenty-year career. His wide-ranging and adventurous fiction from The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven to his most recent PEN/Faulkner Award-winning War Dances, have established him as a star in contemporary American literature.

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Tuesday, November 13th
7 p.m. Centennial Hall
733 N. Eighth Street
Book signing following the event; books will be available for purchase


A bold and irreverent observer of life among Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest, the daring, versatile and funny Alexie showcases his many talents in Blasphemy. Included here are some of his most esteemed tales, including "What You Pawn I Will Redeem," in which a homeless Indian man quests to win back a family heirloom; "This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona," a road-trip morality tale; "The Toughest Indian in the World," about a night shared between a writer and a hitchhiker; and his most recent, "War Dances," about a man grappling with sudden hearing loss in the wake of his father's death.

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SELMA_TO_MONTGOMERY_MARCH_for_the_RIGHT_TO_VOTE.JPGIn collaboration with Blk-Art, History and Culture, Washington Park Library will continue the Black Cinema Film Series. These interesting, inspiring films are thoughtful explorations of the impact of motivated individuals upon history. Sisters of Selma: Bearing Witness for Change. A look back at 1965 and the unsung soldiers of the voting rights marches. Catholic nuns from across the country answered Martin Luther King's call to join the protests in Selma, Alabama. Hear their story and learn how the experience changed them forever.

Library: Washington Park
Date: Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Time: 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM

Other Information:
The traveling exhibit, Sisters of Freedom, African American Women Moving Us Forward, will be on display for one day only at Washington Park Library on Wednesday, Oct. 24. The exhibit consists of several panels presenting women from the 1800s to today.


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Most people are familiar with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) by L. Frank Baum and the 1939 movie based on the book. But not everyone knows that Baum wrote 13 sequels to the novel! It is said that the children who read his book asked for more stories and he began with The Marvelous Land of Oz in 1904. Many of the original editions are kept in the children's section of the Krug Rare Books Room. Just reading the titles to them is amusing:

It has become rare to find the original paper dust jackets intact but we are fortunate enough to have the dust jacket for Glinda of Oz (1920). After Baum stopped writing sequels, 26 more were written by 5 other authors, most notably 19 of these sequels by Ruth Plumly Thompson from 1921 to 1939.

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If you are interested in viewing any of the Oz books, call the Art, Music and Recreation Department at 414-286-3071 to arrange a visit.

Patricia DeFrain, Rare Books Librarian



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Hispanic Heritage Month: Junot Diaz

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10.15.12.Junot.Diaz.jpgJunot Diaz is a writer and educator. Díaz was born in Villa Juana, a neighborhood in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Díaz emigrated to Parlin, New Jersey in December 1974. In elementary school Diaz was was a voracious reader, often walking four miles in order to borrow books from his public library. He completed his BA at Rutgers College in 1992, majoring in English. He worked his way through college by delivering pool tables, washing dishes, pumping gas, and working at Raritan River Steel. He earned his MFA from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York in 1995, where he wrote most of his first collection of short stories. Currently, Díaz teaches creative writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as the Rudge and Nancy Allen Professor of Writing and is also the fiction editor for Boston Review. He is active in the Dominican American community and is a founding member of the Voices of Our Nations Arts Writing Workshop, which focuses on writers of color. His short fiction has appeared in The New Yorker magazine, which listed him as one of the 20 top writers for the 21st century. He has also been published in Story, The Paris Review, and in the anthologies The Best American Short Stories four times (1996, 1997, 1999, 2000), The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories (2009), and African Voices. He is best known for his two major works: the short story collection Drown (1996) and the novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007). Both were published to critical acclaim and he won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Jose Guadalupe Posada

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10.14.12.Posada.jpegJose Guadalupe Posada was a Mexican cartoonist and illustrator. He is best known for his satirical political cartoons. Posada was born in Aguascalientes and received his education from his brother. As a teenager, he went to work for a local printmaker where he learned lithography and engraving. Posada obtained a job as a political cartoonist for El Jicote, a local newspaper, but the newspaper closed after 11 issues. By 1875, he had opened his own print shop focusing on book illustrations, posters, and advertising work. Posada later joined the staff of a publishing firm owned by Antonio Vanegas Arroyo. It was during this prolific time that he created his Calaveras- a collection of prints that satirized the upper classes, current events, and religion. Although Posada died in poverty, he remembered for his satirical acuteness and folk art imagery. Read more about Posada and his work at your Milwaukee Public Library by clicking here.




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Hispanic Heritage Month: Clarissa Pinkola Estes

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10.13.12.Estes.jpgClarissa Pinkola Estés is an American poet, author, storyteller and psychoanalyst most known for her groundbreaking book, Women Who Run with the Wolves: Myths and Stories of the Wild Woman Archetype. Her birth parents were mestizos, Mexicans of mixed Spanish and Indian descent, and worked as laborers near the Michigan-Indiana border. At the age of four she was adopted by immigrant Hungarians and spent the majority of her childhood surrounded by first generation Americans. The tradition of oral storytelling held a prominent place in her life and shaped her views on modern culture and technology. Estés obtained a degree in ethno-clinical psychology and worked for over 40 years as a post-trauma specialist. She often uses her writing and poetry in her expressive therapy. Estés was the first winner of the Joseph Campbell Keeper of the Lore award, and the Gradiva Award from the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis, among others. View a complete list of works by Clarissa Pinkola Estés available at your Milwaukee Public Library here.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Guy Gabaldon

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10.12.12.GuyGabaldon.jpgPrivate First Class Guy Louis Gabaldon was a United States Marine during World War II who despite being only eighteen years old singlehandedly captured over 1500 Japanese soldiers. Guy was born to a Mexican-American family in Los Angeles, but at the age of twelve actually moved to live with a Japanese-American family, the Nakanos, who became his extended family. When the Nakanos were sent to a relocation camp at the start of the war, Guy took the first opportunity he could to enlist. His knowledge of Japanese culture and language led him to be able to work as a lone wolf soldier on Saipan Island, and over the course of the war managed to capture or get the surrender of an unmatched number of Japanese soldiers. He was awarded the Navy Cross for his actions, but is currently under review to instead be awarded the Medal of Honor. Sadly, Guy passed away in 2006 of heart disease.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: America Ferrera

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America.jpgAmerica Georgina Ferrera (b. April 18, 1984) is a Latin American actress and producer. She is best known for her role in the hit series Ugly Betty. Ferrera was born in Los Angeles, California and was raised in San Fernando Valley. She started acting at the age of 16 when she signed with a talent agency. Her first film was the critically acclaimed Real Women have Curves, which earned the Jury Award for Best Actress at the Sundance film festival. After several appearances in television and film, Ferrera landed a starring role on the hit ABC comedy Ugly Betty in 2006. Ferrera has won numerous awards including a Golden Globe for best Actress for her role in Ugly Betty. She is celebrated for her positive portrayals of Latinos and Latino culture in the entertainment world.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Gregorio Cortez

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10.10.12.GregorioCortez.jpgGregorio Cortez eluded the pursuit of some three hundred sheriffs, deputies, and other posse members in 1901 in Texas, becoming a folk hero in the process. It all started with a tragic misunderstanding and poor translation on the part of a deputy, leading to a sheriff killing Gregorio's brother and Gregorio shooting the sheriff in self-defense. Gregorio then spent twelve days on the run, both on foot and horseback, travelling hundreds of miles and avoiding capture for a long time. The event sadly incited anti-Mexican violence by some bigoted Texan communities, but Gregorio's skill in eluding the authorities helped make him a legend to the Mexican-American people of the time. While Gregorio was convicted of second-degree murder upon capture, he was pardoned in 1913 by the governor of Texas. Gregorio's tale has been adapted into a movie starring Edward James Olmos, which you can get from the library on VHS.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Joaquin Sorolla

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Sorolla.Joaquin.jpgJoaquin Sorolla y Bastida (February 27, 1863- August 10, 1923) was an accomplished Valencian Spanish painter. His specialties were portraits, landscapes, and historical paintings. Sorolla began studying painting when he was fifteen years old. At the age of twenty-two, he received a grant which allowed him to study painting in Rome. He received a gold medal at the National Exhibition in Madrid and first prize at the Chicago International Exhibition. Sorolla's most critically acclaimed work, Sad Inheritance, which depicts crippled children bathing by the sea, earned him the Medal of Honor at the Universal Exhibition in Paris. His greatest success was his exhibition at the Galeries Georges Petit in Paris in 1906. The critically acclaimed show earned Sorolla his appointment as Officer of the Legion of Honour. He is considered the greatest Spanish Impressionist artist. Read more about Joaquin Sorolla and his work at your Milwaukee Public Library by clicking here.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Selena

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10.08.12.Selena.jpgSelena was a Grammy Award winning singer-songwriter who became a Hispanic icon in the United States and across Latin America. Selena Quintanilla was born April 16, 1971 in Corpus Christi, Texas. She began performing at the age of five at fairs and quincenerias, and by the age of 15 was awarded "Female Entertainer of the Year" by the Tejano Music Awards. After signing with a major Latin music company, Selena released six albums, including one English and Spanish language album. Selena Live! (1993) was awarded a Grammy for Best Mexican-American Album and her follow-up Amor Prohibido (1994) had four number one hits on the Latin charts. Her English language album Dreaming of You was set to make her a cross-over success but tragedy struck when the young star was murdered by an employee and president of her fan club. Selena was 23 at the time of her death. To date Selena has sold over 60 million albums worldwide and continues to inspire new generations of fans. See a complete list of Selena's works available at Milwaukee Public Library here.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Ken Salazar

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10.07.12.KenSalazar.jpgKen Salazar was born on March 2, 1955, in Alamosa, Colorado. One of eight children, he grew up on a remote ranch without either electricity or telephone. That is where he learned the values of hard work, family, and faith. Thanks to his parents' lessons, he and his seven brothers and sisters all became first generation college graduates. Salazar earned a bachelor's degree in political science from Colorado College (1977) and a law degree from the University of Michigan (1981). In 1998 Salazar won a bid to become Colorado's attorney general, the first Hispanic to be elected to the job. As Colorado's attorney general, Salazar led efforts to make communities safer and protect Colorado's environment. In 2004, he won a seat in the United States Senate. Salazar became known in the senate, as he had been in Colorado, for his integrity and his talent for finding bipartisan solutions to difficult problems. Well known to each other through their work in the US Senate President Barak Obama, nominated Salazar to be his Secretary of the Interior. He was confirmed as the 50th secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior on Jan. 20, 2009, in a unanimous vote by the U.S. Senate.



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Hispanic Heritage Month: John Carlos

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10.06.12.JohnCarlos.jpgHaving just won a bronze medal at the 1968 Summer Olympics, John Carlos entered the history books alongside Tommie Smith when both men raised their black gloved hands in salute and created one of the most iconic images of the civil rights movement. Born in Harlem, New York of Cuban descent, John had Olympic aspirations at a very young age, only to find that the color of his skin was an obstacle to his dreams. Yet he would not let racism stand in the way of his incredible athleticism, or indeed the rest of his life. Now a member of the National Track & Field Hall of Fame and continuing to make speaking appearance, John remains an activist to this day. He has also recently published an autobiography, The John Carlos Story.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Benito Juarez

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10.05.12.BenitoJuarez.jpgBenito Juárez was a political reformer and statesman. Juárez was elected president of Mexico five times between 1958 and 1872. Juárez was born into a Zapotec family on March 21, 1806. As a child, he worked in the fields of San Pablo Guelatao. At the age of 12, he was orphaned and sent to life with his sister in Oaxaca. An intelligent child, Juárez was selected to join the priesthood and receive an education. Juárez graduated in 1834 with a law degree from the Institute of Science and Art. Juárez was active in local politics, serving as a city councilman in Oaxaca where he gained a reputation for defending the rights of indigenous people. In 1847, he became governor of Oaxaca, angering conservatives by passing laws that allowed the confiscation of church property. When President Santa Ana returned to power in 1853, many liberals in the Mexican government were exiled, including Juárez. In 1855, Juárez returned from exile and was appointed the Minister of Justice. Juárez instituted the Juárez Law that reduced the power of the army and clergy.

Juárez served as the leader of the liberal faction during the War of Reform, where conservatives contested with the liberal party for control of Mexico. Juárez resumed the presidency when the liberals won in 1861. After the conclusion of the War of Reform, Juárez suspended payment on foreign debt owed to Europe for two years. The French government used this as a pretext to invade Mexico. Juárez directed the struggle to eject the French invaders. In 1866, the United States government warned the French to leave Mexico. French troops withdrew in 1866 and 1867. Juárez became president again in 1967. Juárez is credited with separating church and state and establishing religious toleration in Mexico. Juárez was elected president for a final time in 1871. He died July 18, 1872.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Roberto Crispulo Goizueta

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10.04.12.RobertoGoizueta.jpgRoberto Críspulo Goizueta defected from Cuba to America with only $200 and 100 shares of Coca-Cola stock, and would eventually rise to become the President and CFO of Coca-Cola for seventeen years. Born into a wealthy Cuban family in 1931, Goizueta worked for Coca-Cola previously in Cuba before he defected after Castro took control. Goizeueta rose quickly through the corporate ranks, eventually becoming the president in 1980. Under his leadership, Coca-Cola rose to greater success, stock prices soared and new products such as Diet Coke were introduced. New Coke also came to be under Goizueta, proving even great businessmen can have a few snafus on their resume. Having died from lung cancer in 1997, his philanthropic work continues through the Goizueta Foundation, supporting educational and charity institutions.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Joaquin Torres-Garcia

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10.03.12.JoaquinTorresGarcia.jpgJoaquin Torres-Garcia (July 28th 1874- August 8th, 1949) was a Uruguayan artist. He was best known for being the founder of Constructivism art philosophy. Torres-Garcia was born in Montevideo, Uruguay but spent most of his life abroad in Italy, France, New York, and Spain. He received his education at the School of Fine Arts in Barcelona where he became influenced by French Impressionism. After school, Torres-Garcia exhibited with many famous artist including Pablo Picasso, Piet Mondrian, and Marcel Duchamp. It was during this time that Torres-Garcia developed his three-dimensional concept for grids and planes made of wood. These pieces, called maderas, were groundbreaking works of art and earned Torres-Garcia international fame. He went on the open the "Taller Torres-Garcia", a school that promoted avant-garde artwork. He is revered today as one of the most influential Latin American artists. Learn more about Joaquin Torres-Garcia at your Milwaukee Public Library.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Gigi Fernandez

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10.2.12.GigiFernandez.jpgGigi Fernandez was born in 1964 in San Juan Puerto Rico. For her 8th birthday her parents gave her a gift of tennis lessons. Inspired and displaying a natural talent for the game, she was ranked number one in Puerto Rico as a junior player. This enabled her to win an athletic scholarship to Clemson University in South Carolina. Prior to turning professional, she played tennis for one season at Clemson University, in 1982-83, where she was a singles and doubles All-American and reached the National Collegiate Athletics Association singles final. She turned pro in 1985 and was the first female athlete from her native Puerto Rico to turn professional. Fernandez was skilled as a singles player, but she found her greatest success in doubles. Fernandez won 17 Grand Slam doubles titles and two Olympic gold medals representing the United States of America, and reached the World No. 1 ranking in women's doubles. She reached a career high singles ranking of 17 in 1991. Since retiring from the professional tour in 1997 at the age of 33, she has since focused on being a tennis coach and entrepreneur. She has also focused on her education, earning a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of South Florida and a Masters in Business Administration.


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Hispanic Heritage Month: Spanish Harlem

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Elbarrio116thLexvia Wikimedia Commons

Spanish Harlem, also known as East Harlem and El Barrio, is a predominately Latino community located in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The neighborhood extends from Harlem River to the North, the East River to the east, East 96th Street to the South, and Fifth Avenue to the west. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the area was mostly inhabited by Italians. In the 1940s, a large number of Puerto Ricans migrated to the area and as their numbers grew, the area became known as Spanish Harlem. The neighborhood is known for its contributions to Salsa music and as a home to many famous artists including Tito Puente, Ray Barretto, and Marc Anthony. Spanish Harlem is a neighborhood that is alive with history and is a melting pot of Latino cultures.


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This page is an archive of entries from October 2012 listed from newest to oldest.

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